Michael Roberson Should be Recalled

There was rejoicing in Arizona and all around the nation as news rolled in that Russell Pearce, architect of the infamous SB1070 (racial profiling, papers please), was recalled by voters in Arizona. He’ll now have to resign or file to run in a special election. Perhaps Nevadans in Senate District 5 should think likewise and recall Republican Michael Roberson.

Michael Roberson is a freshman senator in Carson City, but is already raising a stink. He was one of the most obnoxious, most conservative senators, making several comments in public and during session to get a rise out of Democrats and to show boat to the media.

Because of Senator Roberson’s “provocative” nature, the Republicans have put him in charge of their senate caucus as the lead of fundraising, recruitment and campaigning. As my esteemed colleague Brian Bahouth pointed out, this means we are likely to see more candidates like him running in 2012. That’s not good for a lot of reasons.

The last thing we need is more extreme teabagger Republicans in Carson City. Nothing got done in 2011 because these guys are the party of “hell no.” Balance the budget to keep government at current funding level? Hell no! Sweeping cuts to programs that help average working class Nevadans during hard economic times? Of course!

Because of Roberson, college students got a tax increase of 15% in the form of tuition increases. College students are struggling to make it, but Roberson doesn’t care. He also cut our K-12 funding, which is already the lowest in the country. More bad news for our children.

Michael Roberson doesn’t care about the kids, or about the future. He only cares about the tax rate of his rich buddies. By the way, while the top 20% of income earners in Nevada pay less than 5% of their incomes to taxes, the bottom pay 10%. Yep, we have a regressive system. Michael Roberson isn’t against taxes for the working class, he’s only against taxes for the rich.

Meanwhile, Roberson sponsored bills that free up gun restrictions, put laborious restrictions on immigrants and normal people who just want to register to vote, making new crimes for people that falsely say they have military medals, and eliminating working class government employees from having a say in negotiations for their salary and benefits.

Wow!, those are some wacked out priorities. Get real dude! When are you going to try to help Nevadans, Mr. Roberson? Oh yeah, never.

Arizonans did it. They recalled a senator. So can you Nevada! Time to take this guy to the cleaners. We deserve better!

Justin McAffee is the publisher of the Nevada Ledger. Justin and his wife Aimee own a digital media consulting firm, Most Digital, in Las Vegas, Nevada. They specialize in website design and SEO, graphic design, content creation and photography.

You may also like

6 Comments

  1. Thanks for the thought-provoking article.

    Minor point of difference, however: A tuition increase isn’t a tax increase. Students are paying for the services they’re using.

    Keep up the great work, Justin. 🙂

    1. Brooke,

      Thank you for the compliments.

      I understand the arguments of why tuition isn’t a tax. It isn’t exactly the same. However, don’t taxpayers get the “services” of streets, fire dept., public safety, etc.? What’s the difference? It’s semantic propaganda to make it acceptable to raise costs on people who don’t have the political power.

      If 50% of students voted, we wouldn’t be having this conversation.

      Hope you keep reading.

      1. To your question: Streets, fire dept., public safety, etc. are what may have been considered ‘general welfare’ back in the day. They’re for the whole of the community. The colleges, on the other hand, are only for those who pay to attend them.

        Not to belabor the point, but self-interested whining about tuition increases doesn’t exactly resonate with the rest of Nevada’s citizenry. You may have missed it, but we’re currently experiencing unemployment at historical highs and a foreclosure rate that has driven a large number of people out of their homes. If you wish to apply pressure, may I suggest asking your part-time professors if they’re willing to give up a fraction of their six-figure incomes so that tuition increase would be easier to swallow?

        Also, not to go all FactCheck on you, but I think your final paragraph may not be exactly correct. As noted elsewhere, Citizens for a Better Arizona collected the necessary number of signatures needed to force a recall of Republican State Senator Russell Pearce last week. According to law, Pearce must now resign from office within five days or face a recall election. State officials say such an election would likely be set for November or March. Since it’s unlikely Pearce will resign, it’s a little premature to say “They recalled a senator.” Although perhaps that’s just another matter of semantics.

        1. College doesn’t benefit the whole community?

          Also, hitting people who struggle the most with more fees isn’t helping the unemployment situation. People with a college degree have an unemployment rate of around 4%. Many people who are unemployed are going back to school to retool. Further, many struggling families have kids going to college. I think it resonates just fine.

          BTW, my understanding is that being “recalled” is being taken through this process. Much like Clinton was “impeached” but didn’t actually get tossed out of office.

          1. LOL

            Look, I like your writing and I’m willing to cut you a little slack, but come on.

            First, college students are by no means the “people who struggle the most.” Trust me, amigo, you may not be aware of them, but there are people in Nevada who are truly struggling. The last thing on their minds is the unfairness of it all that you should have to shoulder a bit more of the cost of your own college education.

            Second, I thought you were a PS major? If you’re going to opine on recalling a state senator, may I suggest you at least give a passing glance at the relevant statute?

            Just a friendly suggestion. 😉

  2. @Brooke,

    I appreciate your comments. No worries, I don’t mind criticism, even though I may attempt to rebut some points. I did read the statutes relating to recall, probably more than many. One part of the challenge is nominating someone to run for replacement, requiring equal number of signatures (1/4 of people who voted in the district of the elected official being recalled). BTW, I loved the “let me Google that for you” bit. Totally stealing that.

Leave a Reply